Latid

[19-Sep-2012]

Latid

The Visayan term latid means to draw the lines, to plot, to lay out, and is still very much in use by carpenters and builders. Or for all we know the word could have had another more ancient meaning.

There is no place Latid in Carcar today but the old parish books of the town were so full of it, and it was probably the most inhabited of the places of Carcar mentioned in those old books. But it took some years to settle my mind on where this place Latid could have been.

Since most of the families on the records as living in that place Latid had Al- surnames, I at first thought it must have been the Guadalupe of today. Or that mountain area that straddles between Carcar and Barili. Especially since that is where Al- families are plentiful. And especially also that at that time, I never came across the place name Guadalupe in the records, not until the late 1860s, none before that. Meanwhile, books from 1820s already mentioned Latid.

I had a talk with Argao genealogist Todd Sales at the Mormon reading center maybe 6 years about the placename and he said Latid was the former name of the Argao poblacion. But no one in Carcar could say anything about Carcar’s Latid so, oh well, how did Todd come across the connection?

As I said, but after years, but I’m now fine with Latid being the present poblacion 2 area—Santa Catalina, Burgos, General Luna—as this road network does appear like a plotted subdivision–linatid.

But did Latid also include the sides and back around the church hill, the P. Vasquez-San Jose-F. Noel-round to Gen. Luna streets, of present Poblacion 1, as these too look to be the natural continuation of the plot? But if we do that — include that circumferential as Latid — where in the world would have been Luanluan with which we refer to that entire area today? if we disconnect that road, that may possibly place Luanluan as just from the banks of the river to the camarin. Oh well, possibly, because that’d be the only place where people could have luan (get on board), and not anymore anywhere around the hill. But don’t entertain latter-day ideas about the name: Luanluan was not about the railroad, the place name was in existence already in 1830s records, so it must have been about the river.

And yet, why didn’t they call Latid the Poblacion already, since it was the center of the town? Well, we now know that the term poblacion then meant population (and is still used as such in Spanish-speaking countries) and not the town center, as the term poblacion later came to mean in the Philippines.

Anyway…a physical description in the sale of the Aldocente house and yard (to Florencio Noel who then remodeled the house to what it is today) in 1873 mentioned calle Real as the property’s eastern boundary. So that was what Santa Catalina street was called in 1873—calle Real! Maybe that was what they called main streets throughout the country — calle Real, King’s Street.

Here are some families residing in Latid in the years 1850-60:

resident

spouse

cabeza

ref.

1

Albarado, Bonifacio Ygnacia Alcotas Mamerto Alcorcon

1855

2

Alcachopas, Antonio Colasita Alcaparras Mamerto Alcorcon

3

Alcesto, Ambrocio Micaela Alcoy Mamerto Alcorcon

1855

4

Alcesto, Mateo Martina Alegado Pedro Alcorisa

1860

5

Alcorcon, Victor Engracia Barcenas Crispino Lañas

1858

6

Alcorisa, Andres Teresa Alcesto Mamerto Alcorcon

1856

7

Alcorisa, Fulgencio Matea Alcover Alvino Alesna

1858

8

Alcorisa, Manuel Salvadora Alcoseba Hilario Aldipolla

1855

9

Alcorisa, Ramon Nepomucena Alcoseba Hilario Aldipolla

1856

10

Alcorisa, Saturnino Agata Nuñis Alvino Alesna

1860

11

Alcorisa, Valeriano Manuela Alcorisa Juan Fernandez

1857

12

Alcos, Donato Bibiana Alcover Mamerto Alcorcon

13

Alcoseba, Ambrocio Micaela Alcoy Mamerto Alcorcon

14

Alcoseba, Antonio Marcela Paras Hilario Aldipolla

15

Alcoseba, Antonio Marcela Paraz Hilario Aldipolla

1850

16

Alcoseba, Carmiano Maricuela Alcuiris Alvino Ledesma

1857

17

Alcoseba, Cipriano Maria Pancita Pedro Alcorisa

1860

18

Alcoseba, Eusebio Basilia Barcelona Mamerto Alcorcon

1855

19

Alcoseba, Eusebio Basilia Barcelona Alvino Alesna

1859

20

Alcoseba, Valentin Estefa Aldelmeta Hilario Aldipolla

21

Alcotas. Gregorio Dominga Aldaya Alvino Alesna

1860

22

Alcover, Alfonso Manuela Mateo Sasab

23

Alcover, Francisco Maria Baracayan Gabriel Laure

1853

24

Alcover, Francisco Bonifacia Alcorisa Gabriel Laure

1855

25

Alcover, Francisco 1) Maria Baracayan Roman Sarmiento

1851

26

Alcover, Juan Apolinaria Aleranera Victor Alcorcon

1850

27

Alcover, Victorio Candida Alcovendas Mamerto Alcorcon

28

Alcoy, Alvino Eulogia Emvrado Silverio Remolisan

1856

29

Aldocente, Jacinto Felipa Barcenas Hilario Aldipolla

30

Aldocente, Jacinto Felipa Barcenas Crispino Laña

1858

31

Aleboso, Luis Maria Alegre Hilario Aldipolla

1856

32

Alegado, Saturnino 1) Eulalia Alfafara Victor Alcorcon

1851

33

Alegrado, Hilario Vidala Alfafara Hilario Aldipolla

34

Alegrado, Hilario Vidala Alfafara Pedro Alcorisa

1860

35

Alejado, Alejandro Birena Alcover Hilario Aldipolla

1858

36

Alera, Silverio Patricia Bargamento Gabriel Laure

37

Alera, Silverio Patricia Aledo Victor Alcorcon

1850

38

Alesna, Alvino Toribia Canasa CB

1860

39

Alesna, Luis Maria Alcuiris Gabriel Laure

1855

40

Alesna, Marcelo Gregoria Baquilta Jabillo Genteroy

1856

41

Alesna, Mateo Macaria Barabas Mamerto Alcorcon

42

Alesna, Mateo Macaria Barabas Albino Alesna

1858

43

Aleson, Jose Francisca Albarado Gabriel Laure

44

Alfafara, Eugenio Roverta Fernandez Martin Alfafara

1856

45

Alfafara, Leonardo Nepomucena Baquilir Antonio Alcoseba

1860

46

Alfafara, Martin Leonora Navarro CB

1857

47

Alfafara, Vicente Cifriana Alejandrino Victor Alcorcon

1851

48

Alimbubuyug, Damaso Liboria Aleranera Victor Alcorcon

1850

49

Barcenas, Vito Antonina Alcos Alvino Alesna

1858

50

Barcenilla, Narciso Marcelina Barcia Crispino Laña

1858

51

Bargamento, Juan Anselma Tigley Hilario Aldipolla

1851

52

Blas de la Cruz (Paraz) Gabriela Aleson Pedro Alcorisa

1860

53

Camoro, Alexo Agustina Antonio Alcoseba

1858

54

Cancho, Nicolas Ynes Aleson Francisco Canaria

1853

55

Casinello, Santiago Francisco Canaria

1851

56

Cuison, Apolonio Paula Abayabay Mamerto Alcorcon

1856

57

Dayanan, Venancio Juana Alcorisa Agaton de la Cruz

1850

58

Fortich, Jose Rodesinda Gonzalez Victor Alcorcon

1850

59

Gimena, Andres Nicolasa Mercado Crispino Laña

1858

60

Paras, Alejandro Francisca Aldevera Hilario Aldipolla

1853

61

Silva, Gregorio Estefa Barcenas Hilario Francisco

1850

This list is not a complete one of Latid residents.

[20-Sep-2012]: To be fair, here are some more Latid residents during the period: Petrona Aldave, mother of Ynocenta Aldave, second wife of Custodio Angel del Corro, who was also from Latid. As well as Juana Nuñez, the mother of Fr. Anastasio del Corro. And, of course, Roman Sarmiento and wife Ana Canarias. Some VIPs got omitted.

Andres Gimena (No. 59), by the 1870s had taken on another surname, Avila, and to this day, Avila is what the family is known as.

Note also that during this period there were at least 17 cabezas de barangay having jurisdiction over the residents. Since Latid is just one place, and could rightfully be called a barrio, I take the many cabezas as evidence that the barangay was not the same as the barrio and it was just a grouping of individuals for tax and tribute purposes. For sure, these same cabezas also had other members in their barangays who did not reside in Latid.

Responses

  1. never too old to add something to what i know of carcar’s past. nabusog ko.

  2. [...] (see also Places/B. Sities/Latid) [...]

  3. it could also be possible that what is dapdap today which is across the river was once part of luanluan before.

    • i will publish (but queued) the old places in carcar and perhaps it would be possible to sketch a map of 1850-60 carcar showing its places (barrios) and their possible demarcations. before that would be b. sitios/cogon; /luanluan.


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